Is the Mini Pill the only contraception method that’s safe to use while breastfeeding?

In truth there are more effective, lower maintenance methods that are safe to use right after giving birth. It’s worth noting that lactational amenorrhoea (literally meaning breastfeeding and no periods) is more than 98% effective at preventing pregnancy, but it’s only this effective if:

  • It’s been less than 6 months since the birth;
  • Your periods haven’t returned;
  • And you’re fully breastfeeding day and night, not using supplements or bottles, and there are no long intervals between feeds (no more than 4 hours during the day, 6 hours at night).

Whether you’re breastfeeding regularly or not, here are some guidelines to help you consider your options.

 

Method When after birth it can be commenced Efficacy – typical use Efficacy – perfect use
Male condom Immediately 82% 98%
Female condom Immediately 79% 95%
The Pill Breastfeeding: >6 weeks;

Not breastfeeding: >3 weeks

91% 99.7%
Mini Pill Immediately 91% 99.7%
Vaginal Ring Breastfeeding: >6 weeks;

Not breastfeeding: >3 weeks

91% 99.7%
Implant Immediately 99.9% 99.9%
Injection Immediately 94% 99.8%
Hormonal IUD Within 48 hours or after 4 weeks 99.8% 99.8%
Copper IUD Within 48 hours or after 4 weeks 99.2% 99.4%
Tubal Ligation (permanent) Immediately 99.5% 99.5%
Vasectomy (permanent) Immediately 99.9% 99.9%

Emergency contraception and breastfeeding

If you’re breastfeeding it is safe to use emergency contraception that contains levonorgestrel. If you use emergency contraception that contains ulipristal acetate it is advised that you do not breastfeed, and express and discard milk for a week after you have taken it. If it has been 28 days or longer since you gave birth you may also wish to use the Copper IUD as emergency contraception.

2018-09-25T17:35:20+00:00September 21, 2018|Categories: Hormonal, Pill, Postnatal|